30 Sep 2019: Montfaucon-en-Velay to Tence

Distance 16.5 km High temperature 71F

Underway at 0930 for a surprisingly complicated day that was intended to be shorter. Under normal circumstances I would be staying in Tence tonight (10 km but the next town is another 8 km, making too long a day, and I am in no rush). However Tence is full. So Madame my host in Montfaucon-en-Velay will retrieve me late this afternoon from Tence, and take me back to her hotel for the night. Then, in the morning she will return me to Tence where I will resume walking. Simple?

Due to these arrangements I can leave behind the majority of my kit, taking only a jacket, water and e-reader in my small compressible day-sack. (Such situations are only one reason to carry such.)

At breakfast I chat with the other lodgers, all with packs and hats, obviously walkers. They are three German men who have been walking from their home in Düsseldorf by sections over the past 15 years.

Montfaucon-en-Velay is a big town with all services; within 2 blocks of the hotel, in the center of town, I see 2 banks, at least 2 bakeries, a Tourism Office, and 2 churches.

Leaving Montfaucon-en-Velay, it is a fine fall day, cool with a bit of breeze. There are fine views to the north …

and to the south … (note the cones on the horizon)

… which is my direction of travel today. Backyard gardens have thriving zinnias and dahlias, even hydrangeas (although it would be too late for these at home).

At a crossroads, with an ubiquitous roadside cross, stands a plaque which explains why this is so. It’s helpful to remember how very superstitious the countryside was, and how religion and magic and the supernatural were often conflated. Apparently in olden times, it was thought that demons and sorcerers gathered at the crossroads at night. Crossroads made it easy for them to meet up. So the roadside crosses were a way to stake a territorial claim for the forces of good, denying the place to the forces of evil. This explains why we see so many of them as we walk along, since our Pilgrim route often uses the old roads.

About 45 minutes from Montfaucon-en-Velay there is a bus shelter at a small roundabout, that would provide a roof against rain.

The route continues over an alternating pattern of pasture and forest, giving occasional panoramic views from the ridgeline. The small cones of the ancient volcanoes are multiplying on the horizon.

Mid-afternoon I pass markers commemorating an internment camp on this, the site of an old silk factory, where refugees from the Spanish Civil War were housed.

As it turns out, the French guide, which claims today’s route is 10.2 km, is incorrect. The Swiss guide, counting 16.5km, is correct. I’m extremely glad this was only a day-pack day!

Lodging: Hotel Le Platanes in Montfaucon

Dinner tonight was a feast well-earned: cream of pumpkin soup, pan-browned trout with zucchini flan and lentils du Puy, and fromage blanc with berry coulis for dessert.

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