20 Jul 2017: Seyssel to Serrières-en-Chautagne

Distance: 12.5 km

Weather: rain last night as several showers passed through, breaking the heat somewhat. Afternoon high 84 (better than 92 but still hot!)

Route: The variant through Seyssel follows the riverbank, making a pretty morning walk. There are islands in the channel, beloved by the waterfowl, swans especially. I saw three different family groups, each with their gaggle of growing cygnets. (Gaggle is for geese – what is the collective for swans?)


After an hour and a half we meet up with the main route again at the bridge over the Fier River, whereupon another variant splits off, to follow the road  heading uphill. I decided to keep to the flat. Shortly I came to an interesting complex, something like a commercially-operated state park (a concept Americans will recognize – I’m not sure how to describe it for others). There was a ropes-type obstacle/confidence course, a lake with swimming area, a snack bar, and several different age-groups of children, each being led through activities by young adults. I would say it resembles a summer camp – under the same aegis as at the campground last night – except that there were no tents or other lodgings in sight. Just past this complex was a restaurant- bar, Le Nymphée, which offered an excellent cup of coffee. They were also preparing a very nice looking lunch – if only I were two hours later. So for walkers coming from Les Côtes rather then Seyssel, this makes a good lunch stop.

Returning to the Rhone from the Fier, soon I see a huge sign warning of “Barrage”. Immediately I think “artillery”, as I have passed military reservations in years past. However,  the French have a different language lesson in mind for me. This word is related to our verb “to bar” and refers to a dam. (I won’t bother looking up “damage”; who knows where that might end up.) Just another example of a French word that came over to English intact but changed its meaning. Another example happened at lunch. My server offered me a plateau of cheese. It was a platter that was being offered, not the geologic formation resembling one. So I stumble merrily along, thinking I am reading French just fine, when I get these surprises!

After the dam-age, there are a few quite steep ups and downs mixed into an otherwise quite routine forest track. These are steep enough that I would not want to contemplate walking this section in the reverse direction- the highway would be a much better bet.

Breaking out into the open again, the hamlet of Les Iles has a renovated lavoir, with running water but not certified potable. Still, it makes a nice place to wet one’s hat in the heat. The next hamlet, Mathy, has a picnic table and another non-potable water tap, but no other services. Here in the Rhone valley, the gardens are different: all flowers (dahlias and lillies especially profuse and colorful) with some tomato plants. These have a suburban feel, quite different from the huge country vegetable gardens of the higher region before Seyssel.


At Mathy I take the variant into Serrièrres-en-Chautagne for its food and lodging. The auberge offers a menu du jour, and the very kind lady rattles off the formula. “Yes,” I say, having no idea what will arrive, but the place is full, and locals know a good meal. They have a nice cold salad buffet, the same pork tenderloin with gravy as yesterday, that cheese platter I mentioned earlier, and a chilled fruit compote dolled up with vanilla ice cream and whipped cream on top. With wine and coffee, €14. Eat to walk, walk to eat!

Lodging: Auberge Chautagnarde and they have Demi-pension as well as lunch

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2 responses to “20 Jul 2017: Seyssel to Serrières-en-Chautagne

  1. Love your “eat to walk & walk to eat” comment!

  2. Beautiful pictures again and I liked the “word games” too. Looked up a group of swans and learned that if in the water they are called a “bevy” and if in flight a “wedge.” It’s very interesting how borrowed words from other languages can end up meaning something very different from the original. Hope the weather cools more for you.

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